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I live up in Maine where it snows and gets real cold. One of the problems I'm having with new Avenger (acutally my friend is having with her Avenger) is ice build up on the inside of the windshield. The mechanic at the dealer said she needed to turn on her ac at the same time as her heat to dry out the inside of the windshield. That answer to me is unacceptable but its not my car. Does anyone know the problem (I can speculate a bad windshield seal) but don't know the correct answer and I haven't found a TSB on the issue.
 

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I have had this problem on my older probe, but it was because I had a window cracked over night. You may want to ask here if she left a window open. I know that sounds stupid, but that was my problem. The only other thing I can think of is go to the car wash, high pressure, and see if you can spot a water leak on the inside... you may have to run it through a couple times.
 

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I agree...I don't think you should get ice buildup on the inside...sounds like something isn't sealing right..
 

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The mechanic wasn't wrong, just didn't word it as well as they should have.

Here's something most people don't realize or understand, your defroster uses the A/C system. Think of what the A/C system does, it pumps out cold DRY air. One of the parts of the A/C system is called a "receiver/dryer". When you turn on defrost, it takes the moisture out of the warm air so you're not trying to use warm moist air to defrost your windshield.

So, keep your a/c systems recharged properly all year.

If she ran the heat at full blast for extended periods of time, it can build up some moisture inside the car and in really cold temps it can freeze. Remember hot air rises and it also expands and moves toward colder air. As someone else said, if there are any leaks and it's rainy or snowy outside (or just simply high humidity) some of that moisture can get inside the car.

- Dan M
 

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Still shouldn't build up ice inside unless there is excess moisture in the car, Does she have a sunroof? maybe one of the 4 drains is clogged or kinked and not draining properly and water is entering the car, hence the ice on the windshield there is a TSB on the sunroof hose kinking. TSB #23-005-08
 

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Here's something most people don't realize or understand, your defroster uses the A/C system. Think of what the A/C system does, it pumps out cold DRY air. One of the parts of the A/C system is called a "receiver/dryer". When you turn on defrost, it takes the moisture out of the warm air so you're not trying to use warm moist air to defrost your windshield.
- Dan M
Here's something that others don't realize or understand. Although the A/C system does help dry the air while using the defroster, it isn't as important as some would like us to believe.

The drying of the air is an added benefit of having A/C, but A/C isn't put in the car to help defrost the windshield.

How many cars are on the road without A/C, and don't have ice forming on the inside of the windshield?

Granted, there are a lot more cars with A/C now than there was say twenty years ago. But we weren't exactly cavemen driving around with ice on the inside of the windshield.

There is more to it. So, i'd say the mechanic was wrong. He gave an easy answer instead of finding the real answer.
 

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I get a little ice build up on my windshield in my Avenger and my truck in the winter. It happens when the vehicles sit after I track in snow onto my mats that melts...I find once the vehicle heats up, I run the heat on the defroster/feet heater setting as to dry up my mats and it works pretty well...
 

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Here's something that others don't realize or understand. Although the A/C system does help dry the air while using the defroster, it isn't as important as some would like us to believe.

The drying of the air is an added benefit of having A/C, but A/C isn't put in the car to help defrost the windshield.

How many cars are on the road without A/C, and don't have ice forming on the inside of the windshield?

Granted, there are a lot more cars with A/C now than there was say twenty years ago. But we weren't exactly cavemen driving around with ice on the inside of the windshield.

There is more to it. So, i'd say the mechanic was wrong. He gave an easy answer instead of finding the real answer.
I've never had ice form on the iside of a windshield so I can't really comment on that at all but, having owned many cars from the 50's, 60's and very early 70's that had heat but no A/C I can say without a doubt that A/C is very important in the defrosting cycle. I can't count how many times I had to wipe the window down while driving when it was raining, snowing, or while driving to work on a cold winter morning. I bet if you ask anyone who has ever owned a car with heat but no A/C they will have similaar experiences. I've never wiped down the inside of a window with a car that had the A/C system connected to the defroster cycle.
 

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... I bet if you ask anyone who has ever owned a car with heat but no A/C they will have similaar experiences. ...
Does asking myself count? :)
Dave, have you ever owned a car that had heat and no A/C and had a problem with ice on the inside of the windshield?
Yes, but it was a '69 VW Beetle that heated the air by blowing air across the exhaust manifolds in the rear of the car, and by the time it reached the front of the car, it wasn't very warm. In fact, it was so damn cold I had to wear gloves while driving.
Have you owned other cars with heat and not A/C?
Yes, many. A '74 Chevelle, a 76 'Firebird, '79 Mustang, and a few others that I won't disclose publicly.
Did they have problems with ice on the inside of the windshield?
If there was excess moisture in the car, there may be some ice inside on a very cold morning. But it would go away as long as the air was hot enough and there was plenty of airflow. The hot air prevents moisture from becoming ice, and the airflow dries the moisture. I just licked two spots on my computer monitor, and I blew warm moist air from my lungs on one of the spots, and it dried it faster than the other spot.
lol

Disclaimer: I didn't really lick my monitor. I just know that airflow dries by speeding up the evaporation process. :)

The preceeding post was all just in fun. No monitors were harmed in the writing of this post. Anyone offended by the above post should lighten up.
 

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Does asking myself count? :)
Dave, have you ever owned a car that had heat and no A/C and had a problem with ice on the inside of the windshield?
Yes, but it was a '69 VW Beetle that heated the air by blowing air across the exhaust manifolds in the rear of the car, and by the time it reached the front of the car, it wasn't very warm. In fact, it was so damn cold I had to wear gloves while driving.
Have you owned other cars with heat and not A/C?
Yes, many. A '74 Chevelle, a 76 'Firebird, '79 Mustang, and a few others that I won't disclose publicly.
Did they have problems with ice on the inside of the windshield?
If there was excess moisture in the car, there may be some ice inside on a very cold morning. But it would go away as long as the air was hot enough and there was plenty of airflow. The hot air prevents moisture from becoming ice, and the airflow dries the moisture. I just licked two spots on my computer monitor, and I blew warm moist air from my lungs on one of the spots, and it dried it faster than the other spot.
lol

Disclaimer: I didn't really lick my monitor. I just know that airflow dries by speeding up the evaporation process. :)

The preceeding post was all just in fun. No monitors were harmed in the writing of this post. Anyone offended by the above post should lighten up.
Perhaps you should re-read the first line of my post where I specifically stated that I was not talking about ice forming on the inside of a window. My post was addressing the comment about the A/C system not being that important in the defrosting cycle and my disagreement with said statement. Every single car I've owned that had a heater and no A/C could not keep a window fog-free at all times with just the heater. On cooler rainy days, cold damp mornings, or in snowy conditions just to name a few. I always had to have either a rag or in later years Rain-X Anti-fog wipes handy to wipe the inside of the window down as I drove. In a car equipped with an A/C system that was properly connected to the defrosting cycle I have never had to do the same.

Hope that makes more sense. :)
 

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... My post was addressing the comment about the A/C system not being that important in the defrosting cycle and my disagreement with said statement. ...
Correct. And my post was addressing your comment about the A/C system 'being very important in the defrosting cycle' and my disagreement with said statement.
Simply heating air raises it's moisture capacity, which lowers relative humidity and increases evaporation rates from moist surfaces. And airflow speeds evaporation.

Would you agree that a rear window defroster both eliminates ice and fog or moisture even though it has nothing to do with the A/C? As will the heated windshields available on some cars.
 

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I will agree that rain x anti fog wipes do help! But I have yet to need them on this car so far...but I also keep it in the garage. :)
 
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