What's some of your best stories during your time in uniform?

Discussion in 'Military' started by Derek Lary, Jun 8, 2017.

  1. Derek Lary

    Derek Lary New Member

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    I may not have been deployed (Tasked twice, removed twice), but I think I still have a couple good stories that happened while I was stationed in Minot AFB in ND as a vehicle tech for humvees.

    One memory was that I was placed on a mobile maintenance team, we worked three days, and 24 hour on call during those three days, then had three days off, then repeat the process again (Panama shifts basically).

    There was one weekend that it was supposed to be quiet (I think it was labor day weekend, I don't quite remember), we work in tangent with the 91st SFS who operate on the security of the nuclear assets that we have there. Awesome with a gun, but horrible to their vehicles.

    Anywho, My wingman, a staff sergeant, and I were taking that sunday to relax and enjoy ourselves at our respective homes. Then at roughly, 1400, we get a call to literally drive all the way out to the far side of the field, basically an hour and a half drive, one way.

    The call was simply; "The vehicle won't start, we cant figure out what's wrong..."

    So we go out there, discussing between ourselves while driving out there in our mobile truck...
    Saying things like; "Well, the battery could have died, they do leave the lights on all the time."
    as well as; "It could also be suffocating itself with the air filter being clogged, dusty roads and all"
    We even went as far as thinking that the starter itself might have died, good ol' government parts right?

    So, we finally arrive, minded our Ps and Qs to get onto the site and we find the humvee outside. Typical, it was a fairly nice day out so no reason to keep them locked up in their garage.

    We pulled up to the side of the humvee and the E-5 steps out of the truck, I was driving as he had shotgun, and stepped out of said truck to try and test the humvee to see the problem. He didn't get passed the driver's door before he just stopped and stared inside for what felt like 30 seconds.

    Afterword, he walks up to my window, as I haven't gotten out of the truck yet, and basically said for me to "Go to where I was standing, look inside, and take mental notes on what you see. I'm going inside to yell at someone."

    So, I get out of the truck, walked to EXACTLY where he stood and looked inside. To my dismay, I saw the issue right away.

    The shifter was left in 'Drive' when they turned the humvee off. The first thought that ran through my head was "Well, at least the neutral safety switch was doing it's job."

    I remained outside and decided to look over the humvee to make sure that everything else was okay. going through the checklist in my head.

    Oil level? Good
    Tires? Full of tread
    Brakes? Plenty of meat
    Lights? All functioning
    Air filter? Fairly clean
    At this point, I was beginning to think that this humvee had a service done just before it went out to this site.

    After what felt like 15 minutes, my E-5 comes back, with a sharpie, a piece of paper and some tape.
    So naturally, this got me curious and I watched him to see what he was doing. He taped the paper to the inside of the driver's side window and wrote on said paper; "I start in Park, not Drive!"

    I just about lost it with laughter as he wrote this and I just went back to the mobile truck and waited for him to finish. Once we did, we left the site and did not have another call for the rest of the shift.

    Later on, after two or three shifts passed, we get approached by one of the 91st SFS E-5's and he apologized to us for that practically waste of a call in. We just told him, "At least we got a laugh out of it."

    What about the rest of you guys? Any awesome stories during your time of service?
     
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  2. 5rebel9

    5rebel9 Active Member Site Supporter Level 1 Military

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    Although it has been MANY years since I have served in the USMC as a jet engine tech for A-4 Skyhawks(yes the type the Blue Angels flew before the F-18 of current). I have many stories of my "hitch". But need to refresh my "facts" before posting of them... STAY TUNED!

    But I will post this.

    Being based on the East Coast..EVERY time the mess hall served Chicken for the main course of a meal...the "hordes" of Seagulls that normally stuck around the mess halls DISAPPEARED for the next 2 days!
     
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  3. 5rebel9

    5rebel9 Active Member Site Supporter Level 1 Military

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    Okay, here is one that I can talk about...
    As a jet engine tech for my squadrons A-4 Skyhawks, we had some "older" birds(6) that showed needing an immediate directed fuel system repair to the main fuselage fuel pump unit. A very involving job by NAVAIR directions. The CO called a maint officers meeting of all affected departments, after they were in discussion for more than an hour, Lowly E-3 me was called to report to the meeting. My shop "boss" was glaring at me as I reported in. Seems my work skills and liberty time auto skills had impressed the higher officers and top enlisted people involved in the planning of getting this task completed, OVER the wishes of the head of my shop!(he always played his favorites, and I was not one of them). So here I am with a full "Bird" Colonel and the like, E-7's to E-9's, Telling me that I had been selected to do this task on all 6 aircraft. And without allowing me to check the NAVAIR repair BOOK(no computers then), asked me to describe what and how I would need to do to complete the job.One NEVER goes different from the BOOK with aircraft. My actual task was actually quite easy, , but the BOOK said the canopy and ejection seat had to be removed to do the job(time consuming). I had stated that if the canopy were out of my way , that I would be able to do the job quite well at probably 2 "birds" a day, including the mandatory quality inspections afterwards. Well they all must have been impressed as they said they would seek approval for my proposed way to leave the seat in, Somehow they got approval and said DO IT, you have 10 days to have all the birds done, any leftover time will be total LIBERTY for you.
    Well all were done in the 3 days, inspected by QA and passed with no defects found right down to the huge amount of safety wiring needed for all fasteners involved. My shop "boss" however tried to rattle me the first day to try and "mess me up", but the Maint Chief(E-9) saw and "ran" him off. Telling him I was on a special duty and NOT under his authority till the 10 days were over. Well he was NOT happy about that, but had to follow orders. I spent a nice week out on the Outer Banks of NC, But I also had heck to pay when I returned as my shop boss exacted his revenge. Funny thing was that it did not last long because a new "shop" was created that I was selected for, to take over ALL scheduled maint. engine portion, and not have to do daily flights duties or breakdown repairs. And also got a promotion to E-4 !
     
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