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First post, adding info to this thread to help others...
I just successfully did this repair today to address a p2017 code on a 2008 Dodge Avenger SE.

I faced the same problems as you guys:
1. Is it the actuator or the whole intake manifold? It's a lot cheaper and easier to get the actuator module.
2. Do I have to get my cars computer reprogrammed after?

First, the good news - The repair is relatively easy. And you DON'T have to go to the dealer for reprogramming.
The bad news - You probably will have to replace the whole thing. I'll explain why.

My problem was two-fold, both the intake manifold runner and the actuator module were defective.
I had to replace the entire assembly. Total cost - $250 for the assembly from eBay and a couple of hours work.

Test your actuator first, remove it and try to turn it with needle nose pliers. It may be just fine or you could free it up with wd-40.
BUT - If you detect any clicking or "sticking" as it turns, it is defective. No amount of wd-40 will help that, it's worn out inside.
Mine had a "flat" spot as it turned, it was trying to stop about halfway back through its return movement.
In comparison, The new replacement module turned freely and snapped smoothly back to its spring loaded position without any hesitation.

Next, try turning the end piece of the runner control rod that the module attaches to. It should only rotate a very small amount.
More importantly though, try to pull it in/out. Gently - you're only trying to see if the runner inside will move side-to-side in its housing a little bit.
If you pull too hard that little piece will come out, it's only stuck in there with a small o-ring.
That piece should be in there firmly, and you shouldn't be able to move it in/out. If you can feel movement, then your runner is probably moving inside.
The first two pictures show this little piece and the runner it attaches to inside.

Which brings us to the reason these intake manifolds require replacement, rather than repair or cleaning.
The problem lies in the design, as I found when I compared the new manifold to the old one I had removed.

The runners on both manifolds seemed to rotate freely with the flaps moving about 30-40 degrees.
However, the defective one exhibited a little bit of side-to-side movement.
The new one did not show ANY side-to-side movement at all.

I removed the small piece the connects to the actuator by simply pulling it straight out of the intake manifold.
On the inside, there are four flaps, each connected to a rod that runs the width of the manifold. As the rod turns, so do the flaps.
The rod/flaps are sandwiched between the outer plastic housing of the manifold and an inner plastic retaining housing that holds everything in place.
The inner plastic housing is held in place with two torx screws and pops right out, as you can see in the third pic.
There are five bearing surfaces on which the rod turns, they fit between the two plastic halves of the manifold housing.

The real problem is seen in the forth pic:
Each end of the rod has a small sealed METAL bearing, these were just fine, despite the carbon build-up..
But the pieces that fit in-between each of the flaps are just rubber rings on plastic clips, through which the rod turns!
Mine had not only worn out, but one had jumped entirely out of position, causing the rod to bind against the inner housing so it couldn't move freely.

If Chrysler had invested in 3 more metal bearings rather than these cheap rubber rings, these things wouldn't be failing, They could simply be cleaned.

There you have it. It costs $250 and up to replace this whole thing...for the sake of a lousy 10 cent rubber bearing!!!
After the install I cleared the codes with a cheap OBDII scanner and let the car run for a couple of minutes.
No more codes, no more problems. No reprogramming needed and the idle seemed to adjust itself just fine.
Tested it out and I'm still getting 34MPG, same as before.

Hope this helps someone. Good luck!
runner.jpg
connector.jpg
remove inner housing.jpg
two part bearings.jpg
 

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Oh, one more thing. In the third pic I had already removed the intake runner, I just stuck it back in to show you guys how it looks. But when I first opened it, the second and third rubber rings from the left were in their correct positions. It was the first one on the left that had jumped out of place entirely. You can see the shiny spot just above the second bolt hole were it had been rubbing/binding for some time. Each rubber ring also showed signs of wear from rubbing against their respective retaining valleys. If we had a good source of correct size/material rings (or preferably, metal bearings) we could just repair these manifolds. I'm not certain, but it looks as if each flap is attached with small allen-type set screws. Perhaps they could be removed to allow the installation of new rings or bearings. Just a thought. Rebuilt manifolds anyone?;)
 

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I am having the same issue and I am stumped. I have a 2008 Dodge Avenger SE 2.4 and I am getting the p2004 code and the p0420, but these codes only show up around the second time I start it up and drive it after I reset the codes. I changed the actuator several times, replaced the plug for the actuator, replaced the computer, cleaned the intake manifold (because I was told that my intake manifold fell into the group that didn't need to be replaced), and went through the guide presented here with complications.

I got stuck on step 13. (K602) MFV Signal Circuit Shorted to the (F856) 5 volt supply circuit. When I tested the resistance between 6 and 5 I got nothing at all. So I went back to the top and tried the steps that I missed do to following the guide and I got to step 9. (K602) MFV Signal Circuit Shorted to ground and it showed no resistance to ground.

I would like to get this fixed but I am unsure how to proceed. Do I change the whole intake, just the runners, the actuator, the wiring, or what ever it might possibly be. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Is all you have done strictly ELECTRICAL diagnosis? read the post above yours, there are MECHANICAL causes for the same problem.And much more common than wiring or electrical sensors. and all the gunk is from oil vapors from the PCV system accumulating inside the intake manifold.
 

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Well I cleaned the intake manifold because according to the dodge bulletin my manifold fell into the group that didn't need to be changed. I replaced the pcv valve and actuator. It could be the runners and I was just curious to see what everyone else might think it would be.
 

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I agree with rebel. You can see how dirty my intake was in the above photos. Mechanical failure is far more common than computer failure.

If your actuator is bad, you'd likely hear a high-pitched whining noise from it when the key is on, meaning it's powered but can't rotate because it's defective or the runner it's attached to is frozen. You can remove the actuator and use a screwdriver to try to turn the runner manually. It has a limited range of motion, about a quarter turn. You shouldn't feel any resistance. (That isn't conclusive though, mine felt as though it was turning fine, even though it was defective). It might help you determine if yours is actually stuck in one position though.

I can tell you that just running some additive-type cleaner through your system likely wouldn't solve the problem, if that's what you tried. Once carbon is built up anywhere, it's difficult to remove. If you haven't already (and have the time), I'd say remove the manifold and inspect the runner directly. It isn't too difficult, just be sure to avoid damaging the o-ring on the bottom. It wouldn't hurt anything and at the very least, you'll be able to confirm if your problem is indeed mechanical or electrical.

Bulletins tend to target high-volume complaints for specific models/years. It doesn't rule out the possibility that your particular runner may be binding inside due to a defect, carbon build-up, or small part failure. If it is binding, you may find that you can free the runner movement with some Seafoam cleaner and a thorough wire brush cleaning. If I had more time when I did mine, I would have disassembled the runner rod, cleaned everything, and replaced the defective rubber rings, rather than replacing the entire assembly.

As for the codes returning every second trip - That has to due with how the computer detects problems and stores codes. It often won't set a code unless it detects that the condition(s) has been present for more than one trip, a certain number of miles, at full operating engine temperature, etc.. For example, the "gas cap" (evap leak) signal won't go away until after (1) the problem has been fixed and (2) the car has made at least two trips totaling 120 minutes, or something similar.
 

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OK so I checked it out and the runner rod will not turn.

Magemorph, you mentioned that your able to change the rings. I was wondering how you get them to stay in place after changing them, so it doesn't happen again. Also, where could you buy these rings because I searched online and couldn't find any. Thanks.
 

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You won't know if they need new ring seals til you open it up. As in the pics CLEANING off the carbon build up MAY be all that is needed. Did you take the manifold off the motor to check for the the rods rotation ability? Eithr way the two codes you post of can be tracked to what we are discussing here.
 

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So you are saying you did HALF the needed job? The runner rod and flaps do not move far in travel, but need to rotate freely.
 

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Well a while back I took the intake off and cleaned it because I read that it could solve my issue. When we did this the runner seemed to move freely. I also ran seafoam spray through it after that because it still came back. Today I took the actuator off and tried to turn the runners with a screw driver, but it didn't move and I also turned the actuator and it springs back.
 

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Well its not a physical aspect of the manifold I have taken it off, checked, cleaned it and it still comes back with the p2004 and p0420 codes. I have changed the actuator and throttle bottle numerous times and no luck. Does anyone know about electrical work on cars because I would like to see if I can track down the electrical problem.

I got stuck on step 13 on the guide on the first page of this thread. (K602) MFV Signal Circuit Shorted to the (F856) 5 volt supply circuit. When I tested the resistance between 6 and 5 I got nothing at all. So I went back to the top and tried the steps that I missed do to following the guide and I got to step 9. (K602) MFV Signal Circuit Shorted to ground and it showed no resistance to ground.
 

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The runner shaft in the intake manifold turns smoothly opening and closing the vanes inside each runner? Or are they sticky? If the shaft and vanes are sticky you will continue to have this code (P2004) problem. Please recheck the operation of that assembly.
 

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All - newbie, helping a friend with P2004 and P2017 on his 2008 Avenger 2.4. New solenoid didn't fix it. Stepping through the electrical procedure listed above but just realized I most likely performed an invalid test. Having found 5V in step 2, I am directed to step 7, checking for voltage at the MFV signal wire. Finding .50 while the connector is still disconnected at the control soleoid, I thought I had found an issue, but wouldn't that voltage only be present if the connector is plugged in? Yet the procedure doesn't say anything about that, which would require backprobing or poking a hole in the insulation. Can someone clarify? Thanks,

MT
 

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While I can not speak for your electrical testing end of this situation, many folk have posted of this same code(s) troubles and have found it to be sticky runner vanes and seals of the shaft that is worked with the solenoid so many people have changed looking for the quick and easy fix. Being an 08 and probably high mileage, I would suspect and check for MECHANICAL problem before Electrical.
BUT that is just my OPINION.
 

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Well just doing the electrical tests in the interest of thoroughness, as the car is my pastor's daily driver and doing the intake would require some careful planning. Want to be sure. Anyway, seems like all 5 circuits work, but the control circuit from PCM to the manifold flow valve (solenoid) has voltage with engine off. Is this right, or should it be only with engine running? Also, on the MFV signal from the solenoid to the PCM, with engine running, I get 1.1V, not 4.5-5V. I had no one to help me rev it, would have liked to see if it changed then. But anyway, I suspect getting any voltage there is probably proof that it works, but would appreciate any feedback, thanks,

MT
 

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Here you go.












Hi People...
Hello all, I'm new to forum and have a question. I have a 2008 dodge avenger 2.4L and am getting the code p2004. It seems that this means the IMRC is stuck open. Does that mean I have to replace the IMRC or is this something I can just regrease; or, could this be a wiring problem and if so, how would I go about checking that aspect?
Thanks ahead of time.
 

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Hi all...Hey I had codes 2016 and 2017 on my 2008 Dodge Avenger SE 2.4L, I had a mechanic look and he replaced the Intake manifold runner control sensor...the code light still was on...I had to replace the whole intake manifold and that did the trick....I found on ebay, it was from TX . it was WAY CHEAPER than a dealer ...good luck
 
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